LavenderA.

Germinates: 14-21 days Sow depth: 1/4" Plant spacing: 2' Height: 2-3' Type: Perennial In the garden: This favorite perennial is beloved for its fragrant purple flowers, that bloom in dense spikes in summer. Outstanding in beds, borders, containers and as a hedge. Hardy from Zones 5-9

Culinary Uses: Lavender is used to flavor vinegars, desserts and jellies.

Other Uses: Lavender is excellent in sachets, air fresheners, soaps and as a fragrant washing water for household cleaning. Lavender repels moths and flies. Add to dried floral arrangements.

*Medicinal uses: Lavender is used to relax the body to calm the nerves and to lift the spirits. A Lavender tea is used specifically for tension -related headaches and to promote sleep this is disrupted by stress. Lavender flowers are also added to bathwater for a relaxing bath for adults or children before bedtime. The scent of Lavender is believed to lift mood in cases of mild depression and to enhance creativity.

Parts used: Flowers, Typical preparations: Tea: 1 teaspoon dried flowers or 2 teaspoons fresh flowers. For bath: Add 1 handful fresh or dried Lavender to bathwater.



Chamomile - German.B

Germinates: 10-14 days Sow depth: 1/8" Plant spacing: 8" Height: 22-26" Type: AnnualIn the garden: This variety of chamomile produces an abundance of fragrant, white daisy-like blossoms with conical yellow centers in mid-summer. The fern like foliage is also aromatic. Plant in beds, borders or containers.

Culinary Uses: The blossoms are used to make a tea with subtle pineapple-apple fragrance.

Other Uses: Add the fragrant dried leaves and flowers to herb pillows and potpourri. A chamomile hair rinse is used to brighten fair hair. Steep 1 Handful fresh or dried flowers in 1 liter boiling water for 30 minutes. Strain, cool and pour several times over hair.

*Medicinal uses: Chamomile has anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic properties. Chamomile tea is taken internally to relieve indigestion, heartburn, ulcers, fevers and coughs and as a mild sedative to induce sleep. The tea is also used as a gargle or mouthwash for gingivitis. Externally, a Chamomile skin wash or bath is used to soothe inflammatory skin conditions including psoriasis, eczema, sores, wounds, and burns. .

Parts used: Flowers, Typical preparations: 1 to 2 teaspoons dried petals or 2 to 4 teaspoons fresh petals. Mouthwash/Gargle: Rinse mouth or gargle with the cooled tea.



Lemon Balm C

Germinates: 7-21 days Sow depth: 1/8" Plant spacing: 12" Height: 20-30" Type: PerennialIn the garden: This attractive perennial herb produces bushy stems of broad, lemon-scented leaves. White flowers bloom from summer to fall. Plant in borders of large containers. Hardy from Zones 4 to 9

Culinary Uses: Lemon Balm combines the flavors of lemon and mild mint. The fresh leaves are used in various types of salads, soups, poultry stuffing, marinades and vegetable dishes, including broccoli, beans, corn and asparagus. Prepared as both a hot and iced tea. P> Other Uses: Harvest in late summer and dry for potpourri, herb pillows. Added to water, vinegar, and ammonia to make cleaning solutions.

*Medicinal uses: Lemon Balm's antiviral antibacterial and sedative properties give the herb a wide range of medicinal uses. Lemon balm is applied externally to cold sores, minor wounds; insect bites and added to bath water for a relaxing soak. Internally the tea is used as a mild sedative and anti-depressant as well as a remedy for indigestion, nervous stomach, colds, flu, fevers and headaches.

Parts used: Leaves Typical preparations: Tea: 2-3 teaspoons dried leaves or 4-6 teaspoon fresh leaves. Only up to 2 times daily. For cold/herpes sores: Soak clean cotton ball in a strong Lemon balm tea and dab on sores 2 to 3 times daily. Compress: Soak a clean cloth in Lemon Balm tea and apply to wounds, sores, insect bites. Bath: Add a handful of fresh or dried leaves to a cloth bag and run bath water over it.


Anise
D

Germinates: 7-14 days Sow depth: 1/2" Plant spacing: 6" Height: 18" Type: AnnualIn the garden: Delicate white flower clusters top the feathery, fragrant leaves of this delicate, annual herb. Plant in rows or clusters for best effect.

Culinary Uses: The leaves and seeds have a licorice aroma and flavor. The leaves are used in salads. The seeds are used to flavor cakes, cookies, breads, liqueurs as well as to season fish, poultry, soups and sauces. Other Uses: Add the aromatic seeds to sachet and potpourris. The leaves and flowers are added to water, vinegar, alcohol and ammonia to make cleaning solutions.

*Medicinal uses: Anise seed tea is used as a soothing expectorant for getting rid of phlegm and as a suppressant for coughs, particularly in cases of colds, bronchitis and dry coughs. The flavorful tea is also used to ease indigestion and gas. In addition, anise tea is believed to enhance the body's ability to absorb iron and is used in cases of anemia caused by iron deficiency.

Parts used: Seeds. Typical preparations: Tea: Gently crush 1 to 2 teaspoons anise seed just prior to use. Add 1-cup boiling water; cover and steep for 10 to 15 minutes. Strain out the seeds and drink 1 cup of liquid up to 2 times daily. To treat gas: Drink one cup of tea slowly before or after meals.



FennelE

Germinates: 7-14 days Sow depth: 1/2" Plant spacing: 18" Height: 4-7' Type: Perennialin the garden: Perennial Fennel has tall feathery blue-green foliage that adds elegance to the back of the border. Produces yellow flower clusters in summer, which are followed by aromatic seed heads. Hardy from Zones 4 to 10.

Culinary Uses: harvest fresh young leaves to add licorice flavor to sauces, salads, cooked vegetables, stuffing and seafood. The dried seeds are used to season sausage, cakes and cookies. Other Uses: Dyes wool shades of yellow and brown.

*Medicinal uses: Fennel contains compounds that help loosen bronchial congestion. A tea made with the plant's seeds is used internally to ease asthma symptoms, coughs and bronchitis. The tea is also used to relieve indigestion and gas. Externally, a compress soaked in Fennel tea is used to soothe the eyes in cases of conjunctivitis and inflamed eyelids. A Fennel bath is used to ease sore muscles and to reduce body order.

Parts used: Seeds, Leaves Typical preparations: Tea: 1 to 2 teaspoons slightly crushed fennel seeds. To reduce flatulence drink 1 cup tea one half hour before mealtime. Compress: Soak a clean cloth in warm tea. Place over closed eyelids for up to 15 minutes. For bath: Add tea to bathwater or run bathwater over a sachet containing a handful of seeds or leaves.



ThymeF

Germinates: 7-14 days Sow depth: 1/4" Plant spacing: 8" Height: 12-18" Type: PerennialIn the garden: These spreading plant are covered with aromatic, gray-green foliage. Lilac flowers bloom in the late spring and early summer. Excellent as a fragrant groundcover, edging plant and low hedge. Hardy from Zones 4 to 10.

Culinary Uses: Used in Mediterranean-style recipes to flavor vegetables, stuffing, soups, stews, and fish and beef dishes. Other Uses: Fresh/dried leaves are added to water, vinegar, ammonia and alcohol to make cleaning/ disinfecting solutions.

*Medicinal uses: Thyme contains thymol which increases blood flow to the skin. Thyme leaves are added to bathwater to sooth tense, painful or stiff muscles and to help heal sprains and bruises. A tea made with Thyme leaves is used an s a digestive aid, as a cough remedy-particularly in cases of bronchitis-and as a sore throat soother. Thyme contains antioxidants which are believed to help slow the aging process and the development of disease.

Parts used: Leaves Typical preparations: Tea: 1 teaspoon dried herb or 1 tablespoon fresh herb. Gargle for sore throat/tonsillitis: Gargle a cool thyme tea. For bath: Add a handful of dried leaves to hot bathwater.



OreganoG

Germinates: 7-14 days Sow depth: 1/8" Plant spacing: 12" Height: 1-2' Type: PerennialIn the garden: This attractive perennial produces a mound of gray-green oval-shaped leaves and loose cluster of purple-pink flowers in summer. Makes an attractive edging of groundcover. Hardy from Zones 4 to 10.

Culinary Uses: Known as the "pizza herb". Adds spicy flavor to tomato sauces, pasta, cheese dishes, meats, shellfish and vegetables such as peppers, eggplants. Other Uses: Added to water, vinegar, ammonia or alcohol to make cleaning solutions. Add the aromatic sprigs to wreaths, dried arrangements and simmering potpourris.

*Medicinal uses: Oregano is used to make an antiseptic tea for treating sinusitis. The tea also acts as an expectorant to relive nasal congestion that accompanies sinusitis as well as colds and flu. An oregano mouthwash/gargle is used for inflammation of the mouth and throat. Oregano is considered to be a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants are believed to play an important role in protecting the body against aging and disease.

Parts used: Leaves Typical preparations: Tea: 1 to 2 teaspoons dried or 2 to 4 teaspoons fresh herb. Mouthwash: Pour 1-pint boiling water into 2 tablespoons dried herb or 4 tablespoons fresh herb. Cover & steep for 10 minutes. Strain out the herbs. Cool the remaining liquid and use as a mouthwash. Gargle: Gently reheat mouthwash liquid until warm. Gargle for 5 to 10 minutes up to 4 times daily.


SpearmintH

Germinates: 10-14 days Sow depth: 1/4" Plant spacing: 12-18" Height: 2-3' Type: PerennialIn the garden: This spreading perennial has aromatic foliage with pointed, bright-green leaves. Spikes of lilac-pink flowers bloom in summer. Attractive in borders and containers. Hardy from Zones 4 to 10.

Culinary Uses: Used to flavor hot and cold beverages, sauces, salads, jellies, vegetables and meats. Other Uses: For household surface cleaning, fresh or dried spearmint is added to other cleaning agents such as water and vinegar. Add to potpourris. A mint sachet repels flies and moths.

*Medicinal uses: Spearmint leaves make a flavorful medicinal tea with a milder, cooler flavor than Peppermint. As with Peppermint tea, Spearmint tea is a popular herbal remedy for relieving indigestion and heartburn and for soothing upset stomach. The tea is also used to treat congestion and coughs. Spearmint leaves are added to bathwater to relieve congestion and to provide a muscle-relaxing soak.

Parts used: Leaves Typical preparations: Tea: 1 to 2 teaspoons dried leaves or 2 teaspoons fresh crushed leaves. Bath: Add 1 to 2 handfuls fresh or dried leaves to bathwater.


RosemaryI

Germinates: 14-21 days Sow depth: 1/8" Plant spacing: 10-36" Height: 2-5' Type: Perennial In the garden: This attractive, evergreen perennial has distinctive green, needle-like leaves with pinewood fragrance. Small pale-blue flowers bloom in early summer. A striking plant for borders and containers. May be grown as hedge. Hardy form Zones 7 to 10.

Culinary Uses: Leaves are favorite seasoning for meats, fish, cheese, eggs, soups, stews and potatoes. Chop leaves finely or use as whole sprigs and remove before serving. Makes a flavorful herb butter and herbal vinegar. Fresh flowers are added to salads. Other Uses: Repels moths from clothing. Added to potpourri sachets and herbal wreaths. The fresh or dried herb is added to water, vinegar, ammonia or alcohol to make surface cleaning solutions.

*Medicinal uses: Traditionally referred to as the "herb of remembrance", current research indicates that Rosemary contains antioxidant compounds that help defend cells against aging and may prevent memory loss due to aging and Alzheimer's disease. Rosemary is also used as a stimulating herb for the digestive, circulatory and nervous systems. Taken internally as a tea or added to bathwater.

Parts used: Leaves Typical preparations: Tea: 1 to teaspoons dried leaves or 2 teaspoons fresh leaves. Bath: Add 1 to 2 ounces of dried or fresh Rosemary to a cloth bag and place under running bathwater or add a pot of Rosemary tea to bathwater.



Grow Your Own Healing Herb Garden:

Growing and preparing your own medicinal herbs is easier than you might think. Herbs are highly adaptable plants and generally thrive in sunny locations with well-drained, moderately rich soil and a deep weekly watering. ) Depending on the variety, different parts of the herb such as the fresh or dried leaves, flowers, harvested seeds or roots are used medicinally*. In addition to their usefulness, herbs are naturally beautiful and easy to design with. You may also grow herbs in containers or indoors on a sunny windowsill,

Harvesting Herbs:

Harvesting herbs regularly promotes continuous new growth and provides an ongoing harvest of fresh herbs. The ideal time to harvest herbs is just after the morning dew has dried. Most annual and biennial herbs may be harvested twice during the growing season before the first frost. Cut plants back to 4-6 inches above the ground; feed plants after each cutting. You may also gather individual leaves as needed or harvest whole plants for drying just prior to flowering. Perennial herbs may be harvested once during the first year (taking up to 1/3 of top growth) and 2-3 times per season thereafter. Harvest up to 2/3 of top growth in late spring and another 1/3 in late summer (plants need time to re-grow to survive winter). Harvest flowers just as they begin to open. Gather seed heads when they begin to turn brown. Harvest roots in fall when the upper plant begins to die back; perennials should be at least 2 years old before harvesting roots.



Preparing Medicinal Herbs

Internal Remedies: Medicinal teas are one of the easiest herbal preparations for internal use. Medicinal teas are prepared by steeping a covered mixture of herb leaves and/or flowers in I cup of boiling water for 10-20 minutes (technically called an "infusion."). Fresh herbs contain more water than dried herbs, so the quantity of fresh herb used is generally doubled to get the same potency. When the dried harvested seeds or root of an herb are used to make a tea, the herbs are simmered in 1 cup water on the lowest heat setting for 10-20 minutes (known as a "decoction"), Before drinking, teas are strained to remove the herb particles. Typical dosage for medicinal teas is I cup of tea up to 3 times daily. Tip: Use stainless-steel, enamel or glassware for boiling water and steeping herbs

External Remedies: Simple external preparations are used to soothe skin problems, sore muscles, etc. External medicinal preparations that can be made at home include compresses, poultices, ointments, salves and herbal baths. Two basic preparations follow;

Poultice: Put 1/4 to 1/2 cup of fresh or dried herbs in a blender; add enough boiling water to make a thick, sticky paste. Apply to affected area; hold in place with gauze if desired. Used for acne, insect stings, cuts, scrapes, sprains and bruises

Compress: Soak a clean cloth in a warm or cold medicinal tea and apply to sore joints and muscles, skin irritations and scrapes.

*As with any medicine, medicinal herbs should be used responsibly. Try one new herb at a time, never exceeding typical dosages, making sure that you don't have any allergic reactions or side effects. Most herbal remedies are used for minor ailments for short periods, up to several days. Discuss any concerns with your health professional prior to use. The Food and Drug Administration have not evaluated statements about medicinal use. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any diseases. Keep out of reach of children. Talk to your doctor before ingesting any herbal product if you have an existing medical condition, if you are taking prescription medication or if you are pregnant or nursing a baby.






Outdoors in a sunny location with well-drained soil after all danger of frost is past. For an earlier harvest, start seeds indoors 8 weeks before the last frost date and transplant to the garden after all danger of frost is past. Press seed lightly into the soil surface, leave uncovered as light aids germination. Keep moist.

Tea: steep 1 teaspoon dried herb or 2 teaspoons fresh herb in 1 cup boiling water for 10 minutes. Strain out herbs and drink 1 cup of the remaining liquid up to 3 times daily.



* Warning!

This statement(s) has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat cure or prevent any diseases. Keep out of the reach of children. Talk to your doctor before ingesting any herbal product if you have an existing medical condition, if you are taking prescription medication or if you are pregnant or nursing a baby.


pictures and information provided by Plantation Products, Inc. Norton, MA


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