violaA.

Germinates: 10-14 days Sow depth: 1/8" Plant spacing: 6-9" Height:6-12" Type: Perennial

In the garden: This old-fashioned perennial favorite also known as "Johnny Jump-Up produces miniature pansy flowers in cheerful shades of purple, yellow and white. Blooms spring until fall. Charming in borders, beds, rock gardens and containers. Hardy from Zones 4 to 9.

Culinary Uses: The edible flowers are used in salads and as garnishes for added texture and color.

Other Uses: Add to floral arrangements.

*Medicinal uses: Viola leaves and flowers are used to make a tea for eczema and other skin problems, especially those accompanied by discharge ("weeping"). The tea is also used for coughs and bronchitis as well as for urinary problems such as frequent and painful urination and cystitis. Fresh viola flowers are eaten to treat and prevent varicose veins. Viola flowers contain high amounts of the compound rutin, which helps maintain the strength of capillary walls.

Parts used: Flowers, Leaves Typical preparations: Tea: 1 to 2 teaspoons dried herb or 2 to 4 teaspoons fresh herbs. The tea may also be used externally as a wash for diaper rash. Poultice: Combine powdered herb with water to make a paste that can be applied externally to skin sores. For varicose veins: Add 2 to 3 tablespoons of fresh viola flowers to a salad once daily.



HyssopB.
Germinates: 7-21 days Sow depth: 1/4" Plant spacing: 12" Height: 18-24" Type: Perennial

In the garden: This perennial produces leaves with a minty aroma and spikes of violet-blue flowers in summer. The flowers attract butterflies, hummingbirds and bees. An attractive addition to beds, borders and large containers. Hardy from Zones 3 to 9.

Culinary Uses: The leaves are added to salads, soups, and stuffing.

*Medicinal uses: Hyssop is taken internally as a tea or syrup to relieve congestion due to colds, flu, and bronchitis. The tea is also used as a gargle for sore throat to reduce inflammation. Externally, a poultice of the leaves is used to heal cuts and bruises. Hyssop also destroys the herpes virus; a compress soaked in hyssop tea is applied to sores.

Parts used: Leaves Typical preparations: Tea: 1-2 teaspoons dried herb. Poultice: Mix dried leaves with enough water to form a paste and apply to cuts and bruises. Compres: Prepare a tea by steeping 1 ounce dried herb in 1 pint boiling water for 15 minutes. Soak a clean cloth in the cooled mixture and apply to sores.





cornflowerC.

Germinates: 7-21 days Sow depth: 1/4" Plant spacing: 6-12" Height: 12-30" Type: Annual

In the garden: Cornflowers, also commonly known as "Bachelor Buttons", produce and abundance of bright blue, long-stemmed flowers from early summer through fall. Charming in beds, borders and meadow gardens.

Culinary Uses: Fresh flower petals are added to salads.

Other Uses: Fresh or dried flowers are popular for arrangements. Add the flower petals to handmade papers and potpourri.

*Medicinal uses: Cornflower is used externally as an anti-inflammatory and astringent herb for eye ailments and skin cleansing. An eyewash made with cornflower blossoms is used for conjunctivitis as well as to relieve strained, tired or puffy eyes. Cornflower leaves are used to create a cleansing facial steam for dry sensitive skin.

Parts used: Flowers, Leaves Typical preparations: Eyewash: Combine 1/2 ounce dried flowers with 20 fluid ounces of water. Reduce to about 14 fluid ounces. Simmer 10 to 15 minutes to sterilize. Strain well through a fine sieve to remove any particles. Cool liquid and add to an eyecup. Bathe eyes once daily as needed, dilute mixture if necessary. Cleansing facial steam: In a bowl combine 6 cups boiling water with 2 handfuls fresh leaves or 3 tablespoons dried leaves. Stir briefly. Using a towel to form a tent over your head, hold face one foot away from steaming herbs. Close eyes and steam face for 10 to 15 minutes, then rinse with cool water. Average use is once every 2 weeks.



California PoppyD.

Germinates: 7-21 days Sow depth: 1/4" Plant spacing: 6" Height: 12-18" Type: Annual

In the garden: This ornamental annual produces yellow to orange cup-shaped blossoms with a silky appearance. Flowers open on sunny days and close up in cloudy weather and at night. Attractive in beds, borders, meadow gardens and containers.

*Medicinal uses: California Poppy is taken internally as a mildly sedative tea for anxiety, nervous tension, and insomnia. It has also been used for children in cases of over-excitability and sleeplessness. The tea can also be used to relieve pain and menstrual cramps.

Parts used: Flowers, Leaves, stems Typical preparations: Tea: 1 to 2 teaspoons dried herb. May be drunk before bedtime to promote restful sleep.










E.

Germinates: 7-21 days Sow depth: 1/4" Plant spacing: 18" Height: 18-30" Type: Perennial

In the garden: This ornamental perennial, also known as "Butterfly Weed" for its attractiveness to butterflies, produces brilliant orange to red flowers in summer which are followed by slender seed pods. The lance-shaped leaves have a fuzzy texture. Ideal for brightening up cottage and meadow gardens and borders. Hardy from Zones 4 to 9.

Other Uses: Flowering stems are beautiful addition to floral arrangements.

*Medicinal uses: Pleurisy Root is used for respiratory infections to reduce inflammation and aid expectoration. This herb was highly valued by the Plains Indians for Lung ailments. Today, a tea made from the root is used for bronchitis, pneumonia, influenza, asthma, dry cough, and especially for pleurisy. The milky juice from the plant is applied topically to warts to help soften and heal them.

Parts used: Root, Juice Typical preparations: Tea: 1/2 to 1 teaspoon dried, crumbled root. For warts: Apply the plant's milky sap to warts several times daily.





F.

Germinates: 7-21 days Sow depth: 1/8" Plant spacing: 12-24" Height: 2-4' Type: Perennial

In the garden: This stunning perennial produces honey-scented purple flowers on tall stems in summer and early fall. The daisy-like flowers have attractive, cone shaped orange-brown centers and attract birds and butterflies. A beautiful addition to borders, meadow and cottage gardens, mass plantings and large containers. Hardy from Zones 3 to 10.

Other Uses: Add to floral arrangements.

*Medicinal uses: Echinacea is highly regarded herbal remedy for relieving cold and flu symptoms, fighting a wide range of infections, stimulating the immune system, and healing wounds and minor burns. A tea made from the plant's roots or leaves is used both as a preventive for colds and flu as well as a treatment once symptoms appear. Echinacea tea is also used to help treat chronic fatigue syndrome and yeast infections.

Parts used: Roots, Leaves Typical preparations: Tea: 1 teaspoon dried, chopped root(or 1 teaspoon dried or fresh leaf) The tea may be used externally as a wash for wounds and minor burns. Note Echinacea preparations may cause a tingling sensation in the mouth that is considered normal and harmless. In general, Echinacea preparations are taken for a period of up to 2 weeks followed by one to several weeks during which the herb is not taken.



G.

Germinates: 10-14 days Sow depth: 1/8" Plant spacing: 12" Height: 24-36" Type: Perennial

In the garden: Domed clusters of white flowers top the aromatic, fern-like foliage of this attractive perennial from summer to fall. The easy-care plants are drought and heat tolerant. Plant in borders, meadow gardens and large containers. Hardy from Zones 3 to 10.

Culinary Uses:Finely chopped young leaves are added to salads or soft cheese dips for a pepper flavor.

Other Uses:Flower clusters work well in fresh or dried arrangements. Flowers may be used to produce a yellow dye for wool. Yarrow tea is used to water ailing plants. Add a chopped leaf to a wheelbarrow or compost material to aid decomposition.

*Medicinal uses: A tea made with Yarrow leaves and flowers is used internally as a remedy for hangover to help the body eliminate toxins. The tea is also used to induce sweating to help break a fever, for colds, to aid digestion and to relieve menstrual cramps. Externally, Yarrow is applied to wounds to stop bleeding, for cleansing and to help relieve pain and swelling.

Parts used: Flowers, Leaves Typical preparations: Tea: 1 to 2 teaspoons of dried leaves/flowers or 2 to 3 teaspoons fresh leaves/flowers. Flavor tea with sugar or lemon if desired. Compress Apply the tea externally to wounds or inflamed skin with a clean cloth. PoulticeApply crushed fresh leaves and flowers to wounds. Note: Drinking yarrow tea may cause urine to turn brown; this is considered normal and harmless.



H.

Germinates:14-28 days Sow depth: 1/8" Plant spacing: 15" Height: 4-6' Type: Perennial

In the garden: This attractive ornamental perennial has tall stalks of velvety leaves, and soft-pink, single hollyhock-type flowers that bloom from summer to early fall. A beautiful accent for the back of the border. hardy from Zones 4 to 9.

Culinary Uses:Add tender, young leaves to salads. The roots may be fried with butter and onions.

*Medicinal uses: Marshmallow is soothing, anti-inflammatory herb that has a wide range of uses. Internally, Marshmallow tea is used to soothe respiratory tract irritations due to bronchitis, colds and coughs as well as digestive and urinary-tract inflammations. Externally, a poultice made with the root is used to soothe dry, chapped, itchy, skin as well as cuts, scrapes, and minor burns.

Parts used: Leaves, Root Typical preparations: Tea: Gently boil 1 teaspoon dried, crumbled root in 1 cup boiling water for 15 minutes. Strain out herb and drink 1 cup of the remaining liquid up to 3 times daily. Or, steep 1 to 2 teaspoons dried leaf or 2 to 3 teaspoons fresh leaf in 1 cup boiling water for 10 to 15 minutes. Strain out herb and drink 1 cup of the remaining liquid up to 3 times daily. Poultice:Blend finely chopped root with enough cold water to form a paste like gel. Juice from the root is also applied directly to dry, irritated skin.



I.

Germinates: 5-14 days Sow depth: 1" Plant spacing: 2-3' Height: 9-12' Type: Annual

In the garden: This classic sunflower produces extra-large blossoms with bright-yellow petals and brown centers. Flowers reach a foot in diameter or larger and bloom from mid through late summer. Produces plum, edible, striped seeds. Grow as a colorful windbreak or focal point in beds, borders and vegetable gardens.

Culinary Uses: The shelled seed kernels are eaten raw, roasted in oil, added to breads, or ground and added to flour for bakery products. The flower buds are eaten raw in salads or steamed and served like artichokes.

Other Uses: A favorite flower for fresh or dried arrangements. Attracts butterflies. Seed heads provide food for birds. Flowers produce a yellow dye. After flower heads are harvested the potash-rich stalks may be burned and the ashes used as garden fertilizer

*Medicinal uses: Sunflower seeds are used to make a medicinal tea to relieve coughs and bronchial infections. The seeds contain pain-relieving and anti-inflammatory compounds. Adding sunflower seeds to the daily diet can be helpful in controlling pain and relieving painful conditions such as arthritis. A poultice made with sunflower seeds can be used externally on painful areas.

Parts used: Harvested Seeds Typical preparations: Note: Preparations are intended for seeds that are harvested from garden grown plants. Tea: Bring 1 teaspoon of harvested seeds and one cup cold water to a boil; simmer on low heat to reduce to a quarter of the original volume (about 20 minutes), then remove from heat and steep covered for 3 minutes. Strain and drink 1-cup tea up to three times daily. Seeds Add a handful seeds to daily diet. Poultice: Grind a handful of seeds and add enough hot water to make a thick, sticky paste. Place the mixture between two thin layers of clean gauze and apply to painful areas.



Grow Your Own Healing Herb Garden:

Growing and preparing your own medicinal herbs is easier than you might think. Herbs are highly adaptable plants and generally thrive in sunny locations with well-drained, moderately rich soil and a deep weekly watering. ) Depending on the variety, different parts of the herb such as the fresh or dried leaves, flowers, harvested seeds or roots are used medicinally*. In addition to their usefulness, herbs are naturally beautiful and easy to design with. You may also grow herbs in containers or indoors on a sunny windowsill,

Harvesting Herbs:

Harvesting herbs regularly promotes continuous new growth and provides an ongoing harvest of fresh herbs. The ideal time to harvest herbs is just after the morning dew has dried. Most annual and biennial herbs may be harvested twice during the growing season before the first frost. Cut plants back to 4-6 inches above the ground; feed plants after each cutting. You may also gather individual leaves as needed or harvest whole plants for drying just prior to flowering. Perennial herbs may be harvested once during the first year (taking up to 1/3 of top growth) and 2-3 times per season thereafter. Harvest up to 2/3 of top growth in late spring and another 1/3 in late summer (plants need time to re-grow to survive winter). Harvest flowers just as they begin to open. Gather seed heads when they begin to turn brown. Harvest roots in fall when the upper plant begins to die back; perennials should be at least 2 years old before harvesting roots.



Preparing Medicinal Herbs

Internal Remedies: Medicinal teas are one of the easiest herbal preparations for internal use. Medicinal teas are prepared by steeping a covered mixture of herb leaves and/or flowers in I cup of boiling water for 10-20 minutes (technically called an "infusion."). Fresh herbs contain more water than dried herbs, so the quantity of fresh herb used is generally doubled to get the same potency. When the dried harvested seeds or root of an herb are used to make a tea, the herbs are simmered in 1 cup water on the lowest heat setting for 10-20 minutes (known as a "decoction"), Before drinking, teas are strained to remove the herb particles. Typical dosage for medicinal teas is I cup of tea up to 3 times daily. Tip: Use stainless-steel, enamel or glassware for boiling water and steeping herbs

External Remedies: Simple external preparations are used to soothe skin problems, sore muscles, etc. External medicinal preparations that can be made at home include compresses, poultices, ointments, salves and herbal baths. Two basic preparations follow;

Poultice: Put 1/4 to 1/2 cup of fresh or dried herbs in a blender; add enough boiling water to make a thick, sticky paste. Apply to affected area; hold in place with gauze if desired. Used for acne, insect stings, cuts, scrapes, sprains and bruises

Compress: Soak a clean cloth in a warm or cold medicinal tea and apply to sore joints and muscles, skin irritations and scrapes.

*As with any medicine, medicinal herbs should be used responsibly. Try one new herb at a time, never exceeding typical dosages, making sure that you don't have any allergic reactions or side effects. Most herbal remedies are used for minor ailments for short periods, up to several days. Discuss any concerns with your health professional prior to use. The Food and Drug Administration have not evaluated statements about medicinal use. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any diseases. Keep out of reach of children. Talk to your doctor before ingesting any herbal product if you have an existing medical condition, if you are taking prescription medication or if you are pregnant or nursing a baby.




Outdoors in a sunny location with well-drained soil after all danger of frost is past. For an earlier harvest, start seeds indoors 8 weeks before the last frost date and transplant to the garden after all danger of frost is past. Press seed lightly into the soil surface, leave uncovered as light aids germination. Keep moist.

Tea: steep 1 teaspoon dried herb or 2 teaspoons fresh herb in 1 cup boiling water for 10 minutes. Strain out herbs and drink 1 cup of the remaining liquid up to 3 times daily.



* Warning!

This statement(s) has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat cure or prevent any diseases. Keep out of the reach of children. Talk to your doctor before ingesting any herbal product if you have an existing medical condition, if you are taking prescription medication or if you are pregnant or nursing a baby.


pictures and information provided by Plantation Products, Inc. Norton, MA


UPCOMING TRIPS
Paul Parent Garden Club

Iceland's Magical
Northern Lights
March 6-13, 2018.
Details Here >>
GARDEN JOURNAL
GARDEN PODCASTS
Looking for something in
particular? Paul's topics
include horticulture...

READ MORE »
Private Property Consultation
with Paul Parent
Your Consultation will include the following: 3 Hours with Paul Parent at your home...
READ MORE »

LINKS INFO RESOURCES DOWNLOADS
Home
The Garden Show
About Paul
Listen
Sponsors
Garden Show Topics
Contact Us
Garden Journal
Trips
Newsletter Archives
Podcast
Organizations
Affiliate Relations
Looking To Advertise
Coupons
Recipes
Photos
All Paul Parent Garden Club is Copyrighted and cannot be used without expressed permission from Paul Parent